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The Chessmen

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45818_TheChessmen_TPB.inddThose strange little figures – squat and grumpy, kings and bishops, still evocative after 800 years. They provide a haunting backdrop to this, the final book in Peter May’s Lewis Trilogy. Please don’t feel that you are coming late to the party, because this book stands alone brilliantly, but will almost certainly persuade you to read the previous two. Ex-copper Fin Macleod has returned to Lewis to work for a private security firm. He is unwittingly dragged into a complex saga involving an outbreak of poaching, a dead pilot still at the controls of his aircraft at the bottom of a drained loch, and crimes that were committed decades ago. Unmatched atmosphere, terse dialogue, and a plot to keep you hooked for hours – read our full review to find out more.


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