THE SITE FOR DIE HARD CRIME & THRILLER FANS
FeaturesNews

First look: Soot by Andrew Martin

1 Mins read

Andrew Martin has been writing some of the best World War I crime fiction around, with his Jim Stringer series. But the author is never afraid to explore and experiment, and last year he wrote Yellow Diamond, which detailed the lives and crimes of the overprivileged residents of Mayfair. Now he’s back in the historical vibe with a fascinating-looking mystery set in York in 1799, entitled Soot.

If you enjoy mysteries that come with maps, crime scene reports, letters from the villain and other clues, you’ll love what Martin and his publishers have done here. The dead man is Matthew Harvey, stabbed with a pair of scissors. Harvey was a shade painter, a creator of silhouettes which people would keep in lockets or hang on their walls to remind themselves of their loved ones. The scissors were his tools for cutting out the silhouettes of his subjects, as was the fashion back in the day.

So, Harvey is dead, but his son commissions a debtor called Fletcher Rigge to investigate the killing. It’s a strange proposition but if he finds the culprit his debts will be wiped. The clues he has include six shades – silhouettes of the last people Harvey worked for before he was killed. Perhaps one of them was the killer, or knows who did it? Trouble is, there are no records of who they were and, as it cleverly states in the press release, Rigge must enter a world of shadows to find them.

Soot comes out 6 July from Corsair at £14.99 for the hardback, or £7.99 for Kindle. You can pre-order a copy from Amazon below.


Silhouettes of the six suspects – have you seen any of them?


We’re liking the cover design.


Space has been left in the early proof copy where the silhouettes will sit in the text, making for a multimedia mystery experience.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Related posts
KindlePrintReviews

Rook by Stephen G Eoannou

True crime and crime fiction that feels like true crime are very popular at the moment. Sometimes it’s hard to tell whether the story you’re reading actually happened or not. Which is fine, as long as it’s a good story. With Rook, Buffalo-based author Stephen…
iBookKindlePrintReviews

Secret Identity by Alex Segura

The comic book industry and crime fiction are intertwined. For example, the pulp comics of the 1930s such as Black Mask and The Shadow led to the superhero comics we know today as well as the pulp fiction novels of the 1950s and 60s. New…
KindlePrintReviews

Tom Boy by Shelley Blanton-Stroud

Tom Boy is the sequel to Copy Boy, with Shelley Blanton-Stroud bringing us the further adventures of cub reporter Jane Benjamin in a tale that is lighter than her first outing. Back then, Jane got a job as a copy boy with Prospect, a San…
Crime Fiction Lover