Missing In Rangoon

missinginrangoonWritten by Christopher G Moore — For well over 20 years Canadian lawyer turned crime writer Christopher G Moore has chronicled change in Thailand and the surrounding region through the character of Bangkok-based American private investigator, Vincent Calvino. Moore has penned 13 Calvino books. Most of them are set in Thailand, although the author has also taken his character to Vietnam and Cambodia. In the latest instalment, Missing in Rangoon, Calvino heads to Burma or, as it is now officially known, Myanmar.

The opening pages find Calvino standing in the shell of the Lonesome Hawk Bar, one of the establishments that used to form part of Washington Square. It was a well known and down at heel part of expat Bangkok, recently demolished to make way for yet another block of the condominiums that mark the city’s skyline. Calvino suggests to the former owner that he should consider starting over in Rangoon, a city on the make and welcoming all comers, much like Bangkok was decades ago.

Not that Calvino particularly wants to make the journey himself. He’s being pressured to travel to Burma by a disagreeable English brothel owner, who wants to hire him to find his son. The son has disappeared in the country’s capital along with his Burmese girlfriend, a real head turner and the lead singer in the band the son plays in.

There’s never any doubt Calvino will take the case, especially when his long time off-sider Pratt, a colonel in the Thai police and an honest cop, announces he is travelling to Rangoon. A keen jazz enthusiast, Pratt has been invited to the Burmese capital to play his beloved saxophone at an upmarket club. Off the books, he’s also been asked by his police superiors to help cut off the supply of cold pills from Burma, which are used to make methamphetamine, then trafficked to Thailand.

Rangoon now is a lot like what Phnom Penh was like in the 90s, a heady mixture of breakneck economic and social change, gangster capitalism and political rumour and intimidation. Soon Pratt and Calvino are enmeshed in its brutal Darwinian underworld and shadowed by Burmese military intelligence.

I read the first few Calvino books when I was living and working in the Mekong region in the 90s, but stopped getting them after I left. I haven’t picked up another one until Missing In Rangoon arrived.

Moore has lost none of his ability to convey a sense of menace and intrigue. His descriptions of Rangoon are excellent. In particular, he excels at describing the human and social fall-out that occurs when a poor, isolated country suddenly opens its borders to the world. There are flashes of humour too, particularly concerning Calvino’s interactions with Burma’s self declared first PI and astrologer.

Missing in Rangoon is a satisfying read, a mixture of hard-boiled crime fiction and acute social observation set in a little known part of Asia. What’s not to like?

Heaven Lake Press
Print/Kindle/iBook
£4.84

CFL Rating: 4 Stars

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1 Comment

  1. TripFiction Reply

    Great to see this book reviewed. We loved it because it is set in Rangoon, which until recently hasn’t really been available to tourists – and the book certainly transports the reader there. Thank you!

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