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Say You’re Sorry

1 Mins read

When all our contributors compiled their top five books of 2012, DeathBecomesHer chose Say You’re Sorry in the number one position. She said: “I’m ashamed to admit that Say You’re Sorry was my first foray into the work of award-winning crime writer Michael Robotham, but you can be assured it won’t be my last. A huge search ensues after teenage friends Piper and Tash go missing from a quest English town, but when all the hunting comes to naught, locals decide the girls just ran away. Wrong – they were abducted and held captive, and after three years their case hits the headlines once again when Tash manages to escape. Central characters are the wonderfully conceived Joe O’Loughlin, a clinical psychologist, and his trusty sidekick, ex-cop Vincent Ruiz. The plot has so many twists and turns that you will be engaged from start to finish. Prepare to read this in one sitting as it is impossible to put down – crime fiction writing at its very best.”

Read the full review here.


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